Gov. Inslee announces new carbon plans with Youth Corps front and center

Published on in Seattle PI

On December 17, 2014, Governor Jay Inslee announced the Carbon Pollution Accountability Act of 2015 at the REI Flagship store in Downtown Seattle.    He invited local leaders to stand up front with him – as well as two of the Duwamish Valley Youth Corps!  The Act is focused on taxing pollution and polluters – as Inslee put it in his announcement “We are going to do more than fix potholes; we’re going to fix kids’ lungs.”

Gov. Inslee had previously discussed his meeting with the Duwamish Valley Youth Corps when they presented information about air quality and asthma rates in their community.

Read full story on Seattle PI

DRCC/TAG’s BJ Cummings nominated for Sustainability Hero Award

Posted on:

Our intrepid river advocate BJ Cummings has been nominated as the “People’s Choice” for the 2015 Sustainability Hero Award! Show your support and VOTE HERE (by Dec. 18th) More info available at sustainableseattle.org Thanks BJ for all your hard work to protect our city’s only river!

EPA Releases Cleanup Plan For Seattle’s Polluted Duwamish River

Published on in Earth Fix

The Duwamish River is on the verge of receiving an ecological overhaul, following Tuesday’s release of a $342 million plan to bring the city’s dirty river back to health.

The lower five miles of the Duwamish River were declared a Superfund site 14 years ago. Since then the landowners – including King County, Boeing and the Port and City of Seattle – have been haggling with the Environmental Protection Agency and environmental and community groups over how best to clean the river up. More recently, hometown celebrity Macklemore has taken up the call.

The EPA’s final decision will cost the responsible parties $342 million and will cover 177 acres of the lower Duwamish River. 960,000 cubic yards of contaminated sediment will be dredged from the bottom of the river, and 24 acres will be capped with clean sediment to lock away contaminants below the surface of the riverbed.

Read full story on Earth Fix

EPA decision in; Duwamish River Cleanup Coalition says it ‘does not go far enough’

Published on in The South Park News

The Environmental Protection Agency‘s final decision is in regarding the Lower Duwamish Waterway Superfund Site cleanup. So is early reaction. First, the EPA’s introduction/quick overview, from this webpage:

The Record of Decision – or “ROD” – is the EPA’s cleanup plan to reduce risks to people’s health and the environment from toxic chemicals in the river.

The plan includes details of the cleanup of about 177 acres in the waterway. Cleanup will involve dredging, capping, and natural sedimentation. The cleanup will cost an estimated $342 million.

These cleanup actions complement the work of state, county and city agencies to improve the health of the Green/Duwamish watershed. All of these actions together will remove over 90 percent of contamination in the waterway.

Read full story on The South Park News

Bigger cleanup, but no end to fishing restrictions on the Duwamish

Published on in Investigate West

Seattle’s biggest toxic mess is going to take more cleanup than previously thought, federal officials said Tuesday in releasing their plan for the Duwamish River Superfund site. But when the cleanup is finished, people will still be warned against eating seafood from the river, officials acknowledged.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s final cleanup plan boosts by one-fifth the amount of river bottom to be dredged up and hauled away. In a draft plan released last year, EPA said it would require 84 acres of contaminated river bottom to be removed, while the final plan released Tuesday would expand that to 105 acres. The cost for the remaining work increases from $305 million to $342 million.

Read full story on Investigate West

The Duwamish: EPA cleanup plan ‘huge day’ for Seattle’s river

Published on in Seattle PI

The Duwamish River in Seattle has been what industry likes to call a “working” stream for nearly 100 years. It has been overworked but is finally going to get a cleanup in a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency plan released Tuesday.

The EPA announced a more ambitious plan for the Superfund site that will involve dredging 960,000 cubic yards of sediments from 177 acres of riverbed, with 24 acres to be capped with “clean” sediment.

“This is a huge day for Seattle’s only river, and for the people of Seattle,” said Mayor Ed Murray.

A longtime cleanup activist, James Rasmussen of the Duwamish River Cleanup Coalition, added perspective: ”This is a stronger plan with more enforcement on the river than what they had proposed. This sets the minimum; this is the minimum that should be done.”

Read full story on Seattle PI